Have you heard about Meitu, the photo retouching mobile app that turns people into more cutesy or beautiful versions of themselves? Chances are that even if you don’t know the app’s name, you’ve already seen examples of the final product posted on a social network of your choice. The app has been a favorite of Chinese users for a while, but is only now taking the rest of world by storm. And, naturally, something that … More
Source: helpnetsecurity

Overreliance on smartphones, both in out personal and professional lives, is a reality for many of us. These devices hold a lot of sensitive information – information that could be worth a lot to some people, especially if you are a high-positioned executive in a thriving business. Researchers from mobile security outfit Skycure have recently analyzed a malicious app they found on an Android 6.0.1 device owned by a VP at a global technology company. … More
Source: helpnetsecurity

If you/ve recently installed a Flash Player Android app and now almost every app you open asks you for your payment card details, you’ve been infected with a banking Trojan. It is unclear where the fake, malicious Flash Player can be downloaded from, but it’s likely one or more third-party apps stores popular around the world. What is clear is that the app is bad news. Once victims install and run it, it will push … More
Source: helpnetsecurity

The Ghost Push Trojan (also known as Shedun) is still a considerable threat to Android users around the world. The malware is focused on displaying ads, promoting webpages and apps, and this is how its creators turn a profit. In fact, Cheetah Mobile researchers say that the number of apps promoted by recent variants of this malware rivals that of apps offered by some third-party app stores. These particular variants, that come disguised as an … More
Source: helpnetsecurity

The Acecard Android Trojan is a threat that has been around for quite some time. Its main goal is to collect login credentials used by the victims to access their online banking, payment, email or social media accounts, and it does so by detecting when a legitimate mobile app is opened and overlaying screens over it, asking for information to be entered in them. The amount and types of information the Trojan is after is … More
Source: helpnetsecurity