Malware researchers from the MalwareHunterTeam have discovered a new strain of ransomware dubbed Popcorn Time on the Dark Web.

Malware researchers from MalwareHunterTeam have spotted a new ransomware, dubbed Popcorn Time, that appears to be still under development.

The researchers at MalwareHunterTeam found the Popcorn Time ransomware code on the Dark Web.

This ransomware comes with a singular feature, it allows victims to either pay up or they can opt to infect two others using a referral link. Then is the two other potential victims pay the ransom the original target receives a free key to unlock his encrypted files.

“Time that intends to give victim‘s a very unusual, and criminal, way of getting a free decryption key for their files.  With Popcorn Time, not only can a victim pay a ransom to get their files back, but they can also try to infect two other people and have them pay the ransom in order to get a free key.” wrote Lawrence Abrams from BleepingComputer.com.

The researchers noticed that the ransom note offers two options, pay up the ransom or spread the infections.

“We are sorry to say that your computer and your files have been encrypted, but wait, don’t worry. There is a way you can restore your computer and all of your files… Send the link below to other people, if two or more people will install the file and pay, we will decrypt your files for free.” states the ransom note.

Popcorn Time ransomware

Lawrence explained that it is the first ransomware ever seen with this characteristic.

Abrams, who analyzed the code of the ransomware, said it is incomplete, some of the command and control servers are not working and there are many features that still have to be developed.

The ransom note demands 1 bitcoin, victims have a limited number of attempts to provide a decryption key.

“To make matters worse, there is unfinished code in the ransomware that may indicate that if a user enters the wrong decryption key 4 times, the ransomware will start deleting files.” added Abrams.

The Popcorn Time ransomware is able to encrypt more than 500 file types using AES-256 encryption. The malware appends the .filock extension to the encrypted files.

The ransom note reveals that the authors of the Popcorn Time ransomware developers claim to be “a group of computer science students from Syria.”

Another interesting aspect of this ransomware is the content of the note who promises that ransomware proceeds will go to food, medicine, and shelter for the victims of the civil war in Syria.

“We are extremely sorry that we are forcing you to pay,” states the note.

More info on the threat are available on bleepingcomputer.com.

medianet_width=’300′; medianet_height= ‘250’; medianet_crid=’762221962′;

Pierluigi Paganini

(Security Affairs – Popcorn Time ransomware, cybercrime)

The post Popcorn Time ransomware, pay up the ransom or spread it to decrypt the files appeared first on Security Affairs.

Source: securityaffairs